Nonfiction, Reviews

Nonfiction Roundup #1

One of the hardest things for me to review is nonfiction. You can’t critique these stories if they happen to real people. You can only be the witness from these words and share them. Don’t get me wrong, I love nonfiction. I read it at night because fiction won’t help me sleep. Night is when I need a voice whispering their life to me, their story. Night is when my brain craves science and history the most. So I go through my nonfiction reads fast, but I find it hard to review on their own. This roundup is to help share these stories and get my viewpoint the best I can express it.

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How Dare the Sun Rise: Memoirs of a War Child

by Sandra Uwiringiyimana

This profoundly moving memoir is the remarkable and inspiring true story of Sandra Uwiringyimana, a girl from the Democratic Republic of the Congo who tells the tale of how she survived a massacre, immigrated to America, and overcame her trauma through art and activism.

This book is a look inside the life of a survivor of a genocide that most of us don’t even know happened. In her short life, Sandra has seen too much of the evils of this world than anyone should. She saw her little sister die, she had a gun pointed at her head, she survived, she was sexually assaulted, but lived with the guilt of it all.  It’s a chilling story that keeps you hooked and heart broken that things like this continue to happen and yet we have no idea about it.

This book is in no way a light read. It’s heartbreaking and leaves you shaken. The fact Sandra and her family could survive such horrors and come out in one piece is not only amazing, but it makes you see your own life differently.

The writing in this book is hauntingly vibrant. I cried with Sandra more than once, when emotion found her much as my own finds me. It was a really well done book that makes me want to share with everyone who dares question the need to bring refugees to safety.

The work Sandra has done and continues to do gives me hope for our future. It makes me want to stand up the best I can in the ways I can to help with this fight. Because no one should face what Sandra and her people faced.

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Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8: A Young Man’s Voice from the Silence of Autism

by Naoki Higashida

Now he shares his thoughts and experiences as a twenty-four-year-old man living each day with severe autism. In short, powerful chapters, he explores school memories, family relationships, the exhilaration of travel, and the difficulties of speech. He also allows readers to experience profound moments we take for granted, like the thought-steps necessary for him to register that it’s raining outside. Acutely aware of how strange his behavior can appear to others, he aims throughout to foster a better understanding of autism and to encourage society to see people with disabilities as people, not as problems.

I’m a fan of the first book in this series. I think that it’s important to have books like this from the people with autism and other disabilities because they know better than anyone, even their caregivers and parents. So I jumped on this book when I saw that it was available for review and was coming to the U.S.

But first thing first, I wasn’t a fan of the introduction. To me, it was the thing that I think is the opposite of this book – by someone who deals with autism in the family, but doesn’t have. It would have been fine if it was about a quarter of the size smaller. David Mitchell took too much time to try and make this book his instead of Naoki’s in my opinion. His ‘introduction’ was longer than most of the chapters in this book. I know that this book is important to family and caregivers to better understand their kids. But I think that this sort of crossed the line of not being informative but simply too long and drawn out.

It’s important to remember that this book isn’t just one book, but pieces of Naoki’s other work that has been released in Japan put into one book. Personally, I think you can feel that. It all follows a similar theme but doesn’t always match with the stories around it.

Sadly, I believe like the first one, my ADHD brain had a hard time grasping everything being said in the chapters, my brain would glaze over after a few hours when I got too tired. But I do believe that Naoki’s writing was well done and elegant. I think his writing is also important to better understand him, but also anyone with any sort of disability. I do recommend it, though I do have to warn that it does repeat itself a bit, understandably. I think that was my downfall when reading it at night. Also know there is a story of fiction thrown in there without properly being labelled as such. I spent most of that story confused until I realized at the end that it wasn’t something from his life like the other stories.

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Now You Know Canada: 150 Years of Fascinating Facts

by Doug Lennox

Just in time for Canada’s 150th birthday comes this collection of the best in Canadian questions and answers, covering history, famous Canadians, sports, word origins, geography, and everything in between. 

This was my first wishlist item approved on netgalley so I made sure to drop everything to read this book. I admit, I was interested because my hope is in a few years to move to Canada to be closer to my best friend. But I’m also a fan of random facts and history, so my hope was to learn as much as I could from this book.

I ate the history section of this book. Sadly, most of this book is actually sports and I lost interest after the baseball section of this book, skipping until the Olympics section. I was very disappointed in how much was sports, the hockey section was expected and stretched the longest, but it was still more than the whole countries history. Up to this point, I was in love with this book and in love with the fact I got to discuss these things with my friend. But having skipped most of the sports, I finished the book in one day feeling disappointed. There really isn’t much else to say about this one other than it was good and would have been better if it had paid a bit more attention to the history and people and not just the sports, making it more of a book everyone would have found enjoyable.

Do I recommend this one? Meh. I do the history part if you want to better understand the history from someone who knows nothing about it. I just suggest not buying it if your only going to read the history like I did. If you enjoy sports and reading it, then go for this book.

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