Read Women, Reviews

Review: Blood Water Paint

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Blood Water Paint

by Joy McCullough

Expected Release Date: March 6th 2018

Pages: 304

Rating: 5 stars

Her mother died when she was twelve, and suddenly Artemisia Gentileschi had a stark choice: a life as a nun in a convent or a life grinding pigment for her father’s paint.

She chose paint.

By the time she was seventeen, Artemisia did more than grind pigment. She was one of Rome’s most talented painters, even if no one knew her name. But Rome in 1610 was a city where men took what they wanted from women, and in the aftermath of rape Artemisia faced another terrible choice: a life of silence or a life of truth, no matter the cost.

He will not consume
my every thought.
I am a painter.
I will paint.

Joy McCullough’s bold novel in verse is a portrait of an artist as a young woman, filled with the soaring highs of creative inspiration and the devastating setbacks of a system built to break her. McCullough weaves Artemisia’s heartbreaking story with the stories of the ancient heroines, Susanna and Judith, who become not only the subjects of two of Artemisia’s most famous paintings but sources of strength as she battles to paint a woman’s timeless truth in the face of unspeakable and all-too-familiar violence.

I will show you
what a woman can do.

I first heard about this book from a friend of mine who got an early look of it on twitter. Then another blogger read it and was gushing about it. It moved to the top of my list of books I wanted to read, even before I found out it was about an artist I had read about on twitter who’s story was something I was desperate to read more about. Not only did I get that in this novel, but I got it done in beautiful prose writing that made the read quick and addictive.

The story is about Artemisia Gentileschi, a female artist who painted biblical scenes unlike they had been painted before in her time. She depicted them realistically, not shying away from showing blood on these women and what was possibly their true feelings. All of this was done when she herself was forced to live parts of these tales herself when a friend of her fathers sets to teaching her techniques of painting, done in hopes that her father would get a commission he had always wanted. What started out as girlish flirting and love turned to her own nightmare as her life becomes one of the tales that her mother would tell her. But instead of allowing these things to just happen, she fights back by taking him to court, something nearly never done in this time period.

To me, writing in prose just added a new level to this story, making the reader feel the emotions of Artemisia and the pain of her experience. Prose allows emotion to be better seen and felt, though it can be known to take away from the story. Sometimes I wished that it would have focused on certain events a bit more, had a little more depth to help our understanding, but these moments didn’t happen too often, though happened a lot more toward the end. I might end up doing my own research to better understand some of it, not being fully aware of the stories of Judith and Susanna other than what was said in this book.

The character growth in this book is done extremely well. Artemisia starts out as a girl who’s desperate for love and to get out from under her abusive father’s finger. But she turns into a fighter, something harder. Her father shows a lot of growth too when faced with what happens to his daughter at the hands of a man he had welcomed into his home.

The plot follows the events of what happened in Artemisia’s life, a real artist who’s paintings are still well known today. Due to this, I can’t exactly speak on it or critique it. But it did move at a good pace and didn’t feel overly slow.

I highly recommend this read, though I warn there are a lot of triggers in this story such as sexual assault, rape, abuse, blood, drinking, torture, and murder. It’s something to be aware of and makes up most of the story.

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Own Voice Authors, Read Women, Reviews

Review: Love, Hate, and Other Filters

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 Love, Hate & Other Filters

by Samira Ahmed

A searing #OwnVoices coming-of-age debut in which an Indian-American Muslim teen confronts Islamophobia and a reality she can neither explain nor escape–perfect for fans of Angie Thomas, Jacqueline Woodson, and Adam Silvera.
American-born seventeen-year-old Maya Aziz is torn between worlds. There’s the proper one her parents expect for their good Indian daughter: attending a college close to their suburban Chicago home, and being paired off with an older Muslim boy her mom deems “suitable.” And then there is the world of her dreams: going to film school and living in New York City—and maybe (just maybe) pursuing a boy she’s known from afar since grade school, a boy who’s finally falling into her orbit at school.
There’s also the real world, beyond Maya’s control. In the aftermath of a horrific crime perpetrated hundreds of miles away, her life is turned upside down. The community she’s known since birth becomes unrecognizable; neighbors and classmates alike are consumed with fear, bigotry, and hatred. Ultimately, Maya must find the strength within to determine where she truly belongs.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

 

My first review on here for the year and it was definitely worth the wait. This own voice story is already my favourite read so far this year and we’re only almost done Januaray now.

This story is about Maya, an Indian Muslim teen living in white suburbia, being the only brown person in town besides her parents. The title tells you exactly what to expect from this story, Maya finds love in different forms, finds hate in different forms, and moving past traumatic experiences. Maya finds love of a friendship of a fellow Muslim Indian, who her parents would have loved for her to date, but it didn’t work that way. She finds love in a boy named Phil who seems to like her, but walls get put in their way when a terrorist attack occurs in their state, leaving Maya and her family threatened and even attacked. But Maya manages it all as the strong young woman she is, an insane amount of character growth left in her wake.

This book does something that isn’t done too often. It tells the story of Maya but at the end of each chapter talks about the coming terrorist attack. It’s done in both first person and third person, giving the read a whole new perspective of the read.

The writing in this story was drop dead amazing. I fell with Maya in swoony dreams over the boys she crushes on (despite not liking boys myself, it was simply impossible not to get caught up in her own emotions), the real fear after such traumatic events, leaving me with a number of panic attacks as some of you know. However, that in itself is good. I would hope a book that dealt with tough issues would cause the reader to panic with the main character, to feel all their feelings. And in the world we live in today, a lot of us still have trauma from these sort of events that it’s hard not to let these emotions coming rushing from you. Not only that, but much as other books that deal with tough family situations that leave children in a tough disiciouson, without any spoilers, I felt for Maya at the end of the book, having to face such a choice myself with my own father. For someone who also faced such a reality, it isn’t easy, but I do believe she made the right choice for her, even if her parents couldn’t agree.

Would I recommend? 100%. Go get this book. Read it, love it. Come back here and gush about it for me.

What do you guys think of books that deal with tough issues that we deal with so often such as bigotry, islamaphobia, racism, terrorism, and more? What are some of your favourite own voice stories you’ve read so far?

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New Year, New Rules

Basically I decided for this new year that I was going to change a rule for my blog. With all the backlash on reviewers lately, I felt like I didn’t need to put myself through that stress. For the time being, I will only post positive reviews on here unless I’m given a physical copy of the book to review. I might make some exceptions on books I feel a need to call out, but it’ll purely be my choice. I’m starting my next semester of school today so a break from stress is something I admit to needing. This is my form of self care when Goodreads is taking down negative reviews from reviewers who simply state “I didn’t like this book” as I’ve seen with a few of my friends. The reviews will still be given to publishers of course, with a note stating why I won’t be posting them on my blog.

 

What do you guys think? Is this a good idea? Are you doing something similar with your reviews? Or do you think reviews should be posted anyways, despite the risk of harassment?