Own Voice Authors, Read Women, Reviews

Review: Trail of Lightning

36373298.jpg

Trail of Lightning

by Rebecca Roanhorse

While most of the world has drowned beneath the sudden rising waters of a climate apocalypse, Dinétah (formerly the Navajo reservation) has been reborn. The gods and heroes of legend walk the land, but so do monsters.

Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last—and best—hope. But what Maggie uncovers about the monster is much larger and more terrifying than anything she could imagine.

Maggie reluctantly enlists the aid of Kai Arviso, an unconventional medicine man, and together they travel to the rez to unravel clues from ancient legends, trade favors with tricksters, and battle dark witchcraft in a patchwork world of deteriorating technology.

As Maggie discovers the truth behind the disappearances, she will have to confront her past—if she wants to survive.

Welcome to the Sixth World.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (and 5x 💜)

 

Part fantasy, part dystopian novel, this book brings these genres into a new light and giving us something we haven’t read it based on Native American history and beliefs. The world has been just about destroyed by global warming and Native Tribes have once again taken back whats left of the United States, now known as Dinétah. The novel is heavy with Native American terms, history, beliefs, and more. Which is what brings a new level to this genre and makes an exciting read that’s near impossible to put down. Maggie, the main character, is strong, fierce, and admits she’s no hero. She drives the story and keeps things from ever getting slow. She drives the pace for the fact she can’t seem to slow down. She faces off with monsters and gods, making friends and enemies (a lot of enemies) on the way.

I loved every second of this. I had seen the hype for it on twitter and was extremely interested so I added it to my edelweiss, where the publisher then contacted me to tell me I could get it on Netgalley, after a struggle of trying to get it for a week on Edelweiss. I basically stopped reading everything for this book. And I have zero regrets about it. It probably renewed a love for more Urban-esq Fantasies and even Dystopian worlds. It’s so unlike any book I’ve read and in part, it’s because of how the author drew from her culture. I have a basic knowledge of some Native American tribes and history in part because I’ve taken classes at my college, but I admit, I didn’t know a lot fo the things mentioned in the story or locations until after (it just happens this week we’re learning about one of the big locations in the book). It’s why I’m saying this now: don’t let that scare you away from the story if you don’t know. Take time to read this and use google if you need to. Learn about another culture through this amazing book. The book isn’t written for most of us, but it doesn’t mean you can’t sit down and try it and enjoy it like I did. Which I’m happy I did, it’s joined the group of one of my all time favourite reads.

Maggie as a character is similar to a lot of dystopian female characters, the difference, she’s hard and fierce because she was raised that way by gods. She learned to hunter monsters because of who took her in and due to her clan powers. She actually has a blood lust built into her. But she’s leveled out by Kai, a man she meets who’s a medicine man who doesn’t believe in violence and tries to tell Maggie that there are other ways of going about different then she always has. Kai is a balancing force while also one new to the area, having lived outside of Dinétah, though still knows a lot more then a lot of readers might being Native himself. There are characters who aren’t Native, we meet a mixed race family later in the book who is African American and white. And of course, there are plenty of gods running around this story.

Why this book matters: it was written by a Native American author who draws on their own culture in a way a lot of people outside of it might not know. They avoided the normal Native stereotypes that white people have branded them with while a the same time using those familiar ideas and twisting them to the correct way. There are Medicine Men, Monster Hunters, Warriors, Outlaws, and simple people just trying to survive.

Do I recommend? Uh, yeah. If you haven’t really been paying attention, I’m basically yelling that you should preorder this now and learn about a culture that deserves to be heard. This story and series is my new everything.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s