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Review: Hurrican Child

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Hurricane Child

by Kheryn Callender

Prepare to be swept up by this exquisite novel that reminds us that grief and love can open the world in mystical ways.

Twelve-year-old Caroline is a Hurricane Child, born on Water Island during a storm. Coming into this world during a hurricane is unlucky, and Caroline has had her share of bad luck already. She’s hated by everyone in her small school, she can see things that no one else can see, and — worst of all — her mother left home one day and never came back. With no friends and days filled with heartache, Caroline is determined to find her mother. When a new student, Kalinda, arrives, Caroline’s luck begins to turn around. Kalinda, a solemn girl from Barbados with a special smile for everyone, seems to see the things Caroline sees, too. Joined by their common gift, Kalinda agrees to help Caroline look for her mother, starting with a mysterious lady dressed in black. Soon, they discover the healing power of a close friendship between girls. Debut author Kheryn Callender presents a cadenced work of magical realism.

Rating: 4.5 stars

This book has been on my TBR list for ages. So when I was approved to read the eARC for it, I was insanely excited. Though it took me a while to get to this book, it lived up to the hype.

 

Caroline has been seeing people that aren’t there since she nearly drowned as a child. Her mother has disappeared, she’s bullied at school, and has no friends. When Kalinda comes to town, things change. The girls become friends, Caroline falls in love with the other girl, though Kalinda doesn’t feel the same way or so it seems. They are determined to find Caroline’s mother, even if she’s been taken to the spirit relam.

 

(Heads up, the next part contains spoilers that are important to explaining parts of the book)

 

This story deals with a lot of tough issues from racism, to homophobia, to mental illness. All the while seen from the eyes of a girl who is the victim to it all. Caroline has dark skin. She’s treated badly because of it. Caroline and Kalinda see a gay couple and Kalinda starts saying horrible things about them. Caroline, scared, agrees with her. But in the following days after seeing that such a thing is possible, she realizes that she feels that way about Kalinda, which she ridiculed for by other students, a teacher, and even Kalinda (for a short period of time while the other girl comes to terms that she actually feels the same way). This is all done in a good and honestly realistic way. Sadly, there are still places where this stuff happens and this book brings this to the forefront without actually making it homophobic or racist itself, by saying that isn’t okay, that people should love and be free to be themselves. It’s handled in a way that a lot of books sadly can’t seem to grasp lately. As for mental illness, we learn that Caroline’s mother suffers from depression and Caroline herself seems to as well, at a point where Caroline tries to kill herself after realizing her mother had done the same and was living on the island but hadn’t wanted contact with her due to the fact she was scared of being trigged into falling into her depression again.

This book more than anything is about growing up. We watch Caroline, a stubborn girl grow up before us in this short period of time. Caroline learns that sometimes things happen to be people that they can’t control. She learns to forgive her mother. She’s able to grow to accept that she has a step-sister and a half-sister and she no longer hates them. She’s all in all grow in a way that’s amazing and healthy.

The things I would have changed: Maybe a bit more supernatural? Caroline believes it must be out of her mother’s control not being there with her. So, she has to have been taken by the spirits. She’s able to see them after all, and so can Kalinda, as she later finds out. Kalinda seems to know a lot about spirits, but we never find out why. To me, there should be a little more to this to really account for this. Just enough to make it fit just a bit better into the story instead of how it feels slightly not fluid with this story. After all, the supernatural is part of cultures and are part of beliefs. I loved the supernatural part, it just needed maybe a few more scenes to make it feel less clunky, even if the point was to prove that not all spirits are bad and that sometimes there are real world problems that occur.

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