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American Panda

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American Panda

by Gloria Chao

An incisive, laugh-out-loud contemporary debut about a Taiwanese-American teen whose parents want her to be a doctor and marry a Taiwanese Ivy Leaguer despite her germophobia and crush on a Japanese classmate.
At seventeen, Mei should be in high school, but skipping fourth grade was part of her parents’ master plan. Now a freshman at MIT, she is on track to fulfill the rest of this predetermined future: become a doctor, marry a preapproved Taiwanese Ivy Leaguer, produce a litter of babies.
With everything her parents have sacrificed to make her cushy life a reality, Mei can’t bring herself to tell them the truth–that she (1) hates germs, (2) falls asleep in biology lectures, and (3) has a crush on her classmate Darren Takahashi, who is decidedly not Taiwanese.
But when Mei reconnects with her brother, Xing, who is estranged from the family for dating the wrong woman, Mei starts to wonder if all the secrets are truly worth it. Can she find a way to be herself, whoever that is, before her web of lies unravels?

American Panda is about Mei Lu in her first year at MIT, only 17 years old after skipping a year. Living with the weight of her parents planned out future for her, she finds herself confronting hard truths such as the fact due to her germaphobia being a doctor might not be in her future after all and how her parents handle this fact, or really, lack of handling it in the same way they had with her older brother Xing.

American Panda is probably one of my favourite books I’ve read this year (Yeah yeah I know I say that every time, but it’s true!). It handles a lot of difficult issues that aren’t always discussed and does it in a fashion that’s realistic. Some issues including racism within Asian communities, disownment, germaphobia, not living up to parents expectations, and being the person you really are. Mei as a character is shy but extremely sassy when pressed. Honestly, I fell in love with her soon after starting the book and it only grew the more I read about her. She’s brave and brutally honest when she needs to be the most but is also sweet enough to stand up for people, even complete strangers.

Every relationship in this book in all honesty is handled well and with care, even characters that are more off to the side are fleshed out and brought to life. I’m not always the biggest fan of straight relationships, but the one between Mei and Darren is so sweet you will get cavities. It’s done in a way that’s sweet but real, Mei worrying that her family might lead to Darren hurt from everything she had witnessed with Xing and his girlfriend Esther. The relationship with Xing and Mei is the perfect example of siblings with a big age gap between them, something I know well with my older brother being 10 years older then I am. It reminded me of my brother and myself a lot and it hit me with happiness to see our relationship mirrored in this book.

I could go on forever about this book, but I’m gonna keep away from too many spoilers, just the hints of issues that occurred in the book that leads the plot, as mentioned above. All I’ll say is my life mirrored Mei’s in a lot of ways. One event in particular was almost dead on for what happened after I came out with my dad’s side of the family. All I’ll say is, I’m happy Mei went, even if it led to a huge fight with her family, it gave her the chance to grieve properly, which I sadly never got to chance to do myself.

I highly recommend this book. Its the right amount of sweet and adorable with real life issues that happen to people throughout life and it’s handled beautifully. Also, hot chocolate wins every day.

Rating: 5 stars 

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Halloween is for Jumbies

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Rise of the Jumbies

by Tracey Baptiste

Corinne LaMer defeated the wicked jumbie Severine months ago, but things haven’t exactly gone back to normal in her Caribbean island home. Everyone knows Corinne is half-jumbie, and many of her neighbors treat her with mistrust. When local children begin to go missing, snatched from the beach and vanishing into wells, suspicious eyes turn to Corinne.
To rescue the missing children and clear her own name, Corinne goes deep into the ocean to find Mama D’Leau, the dangerous jumbie who rules the sea. But Mama D’Leau’s help comes with a price. Corinne and her friends Dru, Bouki, and Malik must travel with mermaids across the ocean to the shores of Ghana to fetch a powerful object for Mama D’Leau. The only thing more perilous than Corinne’s adventures across the sea is the foe that waits for her back home.

First, I’d like to thank Algonquin Young Readers for sending me my first book from a publisher for Halloween this year.

Rise of Jumbies is the sequel to The Jumbies, both stories that will live you with chills despite it being middle grade books. Corinne is a young girl who has faced off with Jumbies to save both her town and the Jumbies themselves from her evil aunt. Corinne, half Jumbie herself, is a fierce girl who will do anything for her village, even if her village now doesn’t trust her. So when kids start go missing, she is willing to go to far lengths to get them back, even if it brings her all the way to Ghana and back.

The thing I love most about these books, not just because it’s helped me out of a reading slump, is the fact the author doesn’t try to make Jumbies, a type of monster that was told to children to make them behave, kid friendly. One creature are kids that become possessed by spirits. The only way to tell is by their backward feet. Jumbies will give you chills and make you want to learn more about old myths and legends just as much as the story itself. Which makes it a perfect Halloween read for all ages, full of diversity and simply good story telling.

I personally loved the second book even more than the first book, weirdly enough. This one brought us Jumbies of the ocean where the first one gave us Jumbies of the forest on their little island. We got mermaids and what I could only call boss Jumbies of the water and land. We got off the island and go to Ghana and learn that despite the distance, both cultures still has a spirit of the water, just by different names. We get Corinne being cunning and fierce as ever, who is willing to make the ultimate sacrifice for the other kids of her island. The story is exciting and fixes what was left open in the first book while picking up the pace. I admit, I didn’t see some of the bigger plot twists coming and laughed more than once aloud. This book is worth the hype around it. It’s fun and beautiful.

I highly recommend this book to fans of creepy stories for all ages. I think that its stuff that kids wouldn’t really find creepy or think too much about while adults get that chill from the descriptions while enjoying a fun story and the friendship between characters. Pick up the first book first, because it’ll help give you a better understanding of Severine and the character of Allan, who becomes important in this story.

Rating: 4 stars

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Annie On My Mind

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Annie on My Mind

by Nancy Garden

This groundbreaking book is the story of two teenage girls whose friendship blossoms into love and who, despite pressures from family and school that threaten their relationship, promise to be true to each other and their feelings. The book has been banned from many school libraries and publicly burned in Kansas City.

Annie On My Mind is THE gay book. And I was lucky enough to get a chance to read and review it for an upcoming re-release. So with banned book week here, I sat down and read through this book finally.

We follow Liza and Annie in the year that they fell in love while Liza is looking back on the whole experience. It starts out sweet and wonderful, but trouble strikes when the two are caught together at Liza’s teachers’ house. Liza in turn is nearly expelled for simply being gay in the 1980’s. Luckily, she wasn’t, but the two teachers who are also gay lose their jobs at the school for the same issue.

All of which is still a nightmare for me, a gay genderfluid person. I grew up in the late 1990’s and early 2000’s. I witnessed a lot of homophobic behavior while it was still considered a mental illness. I grew up knowing it was ‘wrong’. Things have changed greatly, but with the current political climate, I fear that still that I could not be allowed to work in my dream job, a library, simply for being gay. It’s less likely now and I’m thankful for that every day, but this book simply reminded me of these old fears.

The story itself is sweet, though possibly a bit naive considering when this book takes place and where. Two girls falling deeply in love with each other and deciding that they rather not live in a make-believe world like they originally did, which seems a bit odd for actual college seniors to actually do. A lot of things like this haven’t aged too well with this book. It is a good book with a good message, but teens today are a lot different then they were and a lot would find that them living in their pretend worlds off.

There’s a lot that isn’t explained in this book that really should have been. Both Liza and Annie live in New York City during a time when Gay rights was huge, a long with the AIDs epidemic, neither of which are mentioned or even remotely acknowledged as being a thing. I realize that it’s possibly because during that time period the author might not have been part of it, but living in New York, you would think they would both know being gay is a thing and that the hysterical nature of the homophobia they face is partly due to the AIDs epidemic, not just the supposed ‘wrongness’.

Nowhere in the book does it mention the year, which leaves you think the author meant for it to be one of those books that are simply universal. Sadly, it doesn’t hold up that way anymore. For starters, payphones are no longer a thing, which get featured heavily in the book. Students would no longer nearly be expelled from school for being caught half naked with another girl outside of school, though even in this book its mentioned how wrong that it was in the first place Liza was going through it. I’ve had plenty of openingly gay teachers who haven’t lost their jobs for being gay, thankfully. My suggestion to fix the confusion would to be to add a forward to explain these things or somewhere just stick a date for readers to better understand that this takes place in our not so pleasant past.

The book might not have aged well, but the story is itself is still important. Everyone should understand how far we’ve come to be able to just marry our partners compared to nearly having your school career ruined for being gay. I think the story itself is good and sweet. Teens and everyone should be able to see what a healthy gay relationship looks like, even if its no always perfect.

I recommend this book to anyone who wants to just read a good LGBTQA book that’s sweet and helps us better understand our past as well.

Rating: 3 stars 

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The Girl With The Red Balloon

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The Girl with the Red Balloon (The Balloonmakers, #1)

by Katherine Locke

When sixteen-year-old Ellie Baum accidentally time-travels via red balloon to 1988 East Berlin, she’s caught up in a conspiracy of history and magic. She meets members of an underground guild in East Berlin who use balloons and magic to help people escape over the Wall—but even to the balloon makers, Ellie’s time travel is a mystery. When it becomes clear that someone is using dark magic to change history, Ellie must risk everything—including her only way home—to stop the process.

This might be one of the few ARCs that’s still full of errors but is simply so good I couldn’t put it down and automatically gets 5 stars. The story gives us three perspectives, Ellie, Benno, and Kai. Ellie is in Germany for a class trip to see the country her grandfather was originally from before the Holocaust. However, when she grabs a red balloon during her trip, she is sent back in time to 1988 and East Berlin, a time when the wall was still standing. She meets Kai and Mitzi who are Runners of balloons that are full of magic that helps people flee from horrible places to freedom, which was how Benno, Ellie’s grandfather was saved from death himself.

The plot of this book carries from page one to the end. It’s never dull or boring for a single second. I had such a hard time putting this book down. It was a quick read in that sense because it brings you on such a journey without a minute of dullness that keeps you completely captivated. And unlike most time travel books, it’s not over down or using the same tropes throughout the book that leave it feeling boring. It’s original in every sense and so is the magic in it as well. It combined both magic and science into an almost believable mix that makes you curious but leaving you unsure if you should ever touch a red balloon again.

The characters to me felt real, which is always the key to what I’m looking for in them while reading. Each of the three main characters and Ellie’s friends all have a connection to those prosecuted during the Holocaust. Kai is Romani, Ellie is Jewish, and Mitzi is gay. All of this is still important for Germany in this time when Communism is still big in East Germany and people were still being prosecuted for being different and disappearing. This story reminds us that things are more complicated than we understand, just like situations and characters are. We watch characters go through motions, with understanding the trauma to people and learning to understand that generations of Germans that weren’t involved in the Holocaust aren’t their grandparents. It’s all complicated matters that are talked through and discussed that are super complicated and neither side is right or wrong.

Like I mentioned, the ARC I received was full of errors within the writing. Some were as small as the wrong tense of a word to little things in the plot that probably wasn’t changed when she sent it to the publisher, which is understandable. It made for some confusing moments, but the story itself was so good that it helped carry the story despite it.

One being was Kai mentioned that only the balloon makers can see balloons once in flight because their blood is used in the magic. However Aurora tells Ellie she can’t. This was never said either way if it was a mistake or something in the plot. Another was the fact Runner’s learn the train schedule due to the location of their headquarters. They know the times of trains, but only once do they ever check their watches for the time. This bothered me a bit seeing as its used for a plot twist later. I wish it had been mentioned a few more times though just in my personal opinion.

Do I recommend? Yes. Go support Jewish authors right now anyway with everything happening right now, but make sure you preorder this book or get it when it comes out. It’s worth the read and is honestly amazing. I can’t wait for the next book already. I already know I’m going to miss this read and I just finished it.

Rating: 5 stars

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Blogging For Books Reads: Women In Sports

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Women In Sports: 50 Fearless Athletes Who Played to Win

by Rachel Ignotofsky

Women in Sports highlights notable women’s contributions to competitive athletics to inspire readers young and old. Keeping girls interested in sports has never been more important: research suggests that girls who play sports get better grades and have higher self-esteem–but girls are six times more likely to quit playing sports than boys and are unlikely to see female athlete role models in the media. A fascinating collection full of striking, singular art, Women in Sports features 50 profiles and illustrated portraits of women athletes from the 1800s to today including trailblazers, Olympians, and record-breakers in more than 40 different sports. The book also contains infographics about relevant topics such as muscle anatomy, a timeline of women’s participation in sports, statistics about women in athletics, and influential female teams.

I’m not huge into sports other than Baseball and female Soccer nor was I ever good at sports growing up. But when the people of the amazing book Women In Science decides to make one about Women in Sports, I couldn’t walk away from this book. I was lucky enough to get both an eARC for this and Physical copy, which is the best way to experience this book and the beautiful artwork that goes with it.

It’s a lovely read for those who like sports and even those of us who don’t. It’s fully of inspiring women from around the world from early years to present day. Admittedly, I enjoyed the more historical parts of the book more due to the fact I hadn’t heard of these women as much and they took a lot of the steps that led to women in sports today. I skimmed more of the women of today, already knowing most of their stories, though their accomplishments aren’t less important. All of the women in this book are inspiring and who worked not only for women’s rights in sports but also in the world around us.

The art like I mentioned before is beautiful. I seriously love the style and colors used and it added in keeping the book feeling fun when sometimes books like this can get tiring depending on what facts they stick to. The attention to detail is amazing, every little image on their pages have to do with that woman and her sport and it gives you an idea what your about to read even before you read it.

Do I recommend it? I do for women and men with some interest in sports or sports history. I think that if you have an interest in sports in particular, it will hold your attention for a lot longer than it did mine.

Rating: 3 stars

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Wicked Like Wildfire

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Wicked Like a Wildfire

by Lana Popović 

All the women in Iris and Malina’s family have the unique magical ability or “gleam” to manipulate beauty. Iris sees flowers as fractals and turns her kaleidoscope visions into glasswork, while Malina interprets moods as music. But their mother has strict rules to keep their gifts a secret, even in their secluded sea-side town. Iris and Malina are not allowed to share their magic with anyone, and above all, they are forbidden from falling in love. 
But when their mother is mysteriously attacked, the sisters will have to unearth the truth behind the quiet lives their mother has built for them. They will discover a wicked curse that haunts their family line—but will they find that the very magic that bonds them together is destined to tear them apart forever?

We follow Iris and Malina, twins, who just happen to have a magic that only their family seems to possess. They live sheltered lives in almost hiding, never allowed to let anyone know of their gifts. But a strange woman suddenly appears at their mom’s cafe and everything changes after.

So this book is interesting. The magic in it is beautiful though hard to imagine, I don’t know if its because even the author doesn’t know how to describe it or there isn’t the right words for it. I found it a bit hard to understand at times. It’s an interesting idea, the idea of enhancing the senses in this way and having it be how the magic works in this story. Though I admit, what Iris’s magic of adding to the sense of sight reminded me of my visual disorder. Though it’s less fun and more annoying at times as well as beautiful. Unlike Iris, I can’t make things bloom and what not, but I see spots and colors and constant static in my vision that sometimes reminds me of fireflies. Which did annoy me a bit because sadly, what I have isn’t magic and it isn’t always beautiful. I wish there had been more to, a darker side or parts she didn’t like with it, but from what it seems, it’s just beautiful.

As for the characters, it’s a little complicated. The story deals heavily with abuse in different forms. Their mother is both physically abusive but also verbally. And Iris is learning it from her and does it back to her mother. But her mother we learn came from a very controlling and abusive family herself. It’s important this takes place in Eastern Europe, but that doesn’t excuse abuse, even if things aren’t the same in certain aspects as in the West. This honestly made me uncomfortable and made me question the story a bit if it was for me. But I kept reading to better get an idea of it and got hooked on the beauty of the words.

As for the plot, it was really interesting, if not a bit slow. It started out alright, having had to set things up and then it picked up fast. And there were plenty of twists I didn’t see coming at all. It kept me guessing and I found it did so well. Even what I did guess I didn’t guess fully. There was always more to it. But just before I finished the story slowed to a crawl. I seriously almost stopped at about 95% more than once and took me a few days just for that. I think it could have easily cut a good amount of it or summed it up easier and didn’t leave the reader a bit frustrated when the story had been so good up to that point.

Do I recommend? Yes and no. If you’re triggered by abuse, stay away from it. But if you love magic and the beauty that words can do, I do recommend it. It’s also a pretty great diverse amount of characters from Iris and Malina who are half Asian, to a gay couple, to Romani family that they are good friends with. I think that in itself is partly worth it.

Rating: 3 stars

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My Rad Life

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My Rad Life: A Journal

by Kate Schatz and Miriam Klein Stahl

A companion to the New York Times bestseller Rad American Women A-Z and Rad Women Worldwide, this cool guided journal draws from a number of the “rad” women featured in both books, while also including a diverse range of new women, all of whom come to life via inspirational quotes and paper cut portraits.Blank pages invite doodling, lined pages encourage writing, and a collection of thought-provoking prompts encourage users to get to know themselves better by recording their thoughts and ideas on paper.

Originally I had gotten this journal as an ebook a while back, but due to it being something that you need to take part in and write in, I felt like I couldn’t review it until I saw a real copy of it. It just happened that I was able to snag a real copy. And I’m so happy I did because I don’t think an ebook copy would do this justice.

It’s a brightly colored book filled with quotes and images of women from this time and the past. It gives you suggestions on how to fill the journal but also gives you plenty of free space to do whatever you want. I think it’s something that women of all ages could love this book. It celebrates women and being women and is something we need to do more often.

I already have plans for my copy. I’m planning on doing pictures for each woman based on the things they are known for and fought for, that way it’s easy to know more about them than just a quote because we don’t always need words. I also plan on doing some of the prompts offered.

I’m really excited about this book and it can give you inspiration every day when you need it in your life and drive you to be a better person and a better you. I highly recommend it if you want something fun and journal like while learning about different women from history and who are fighting still today.

Rating: 4 stars

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#NotYourPrincess

#Notyourprincess: Voices of Native American Women

by Lisa Charleyboy & Mary Beth Leatherdale

Whether looking back to a troubled past or welcoming a hopeful future, the powerful voices of Indigenous women across North America resound in this book. In the same style as the best-selling Dreaming in Indian, #NotYourPrincess presents an eclectic collection of poems, essays, interviews, and art that combine to express the experience of being a Native woman. Stories of abuse, humiliation, and stereotyping are countered by the voices of passionate women making themselves heard and demanding change. Sometimes angry, often reflective, but always strong, the women in this book will give teen readers insight into the lives of women who, for so long, have been virtually invisible.

To me this, this collection of poetry and prose is important. It gives voices to Indigenous women, tells their stories and empowers their sisters to embrace themselves and who they are. To me, this collection that contains experiences I haven’t felt myself and experiences I deal with as well into words. The poems and stories that did this was stories talking about how they weren’t raised with their heritage and have to learn it on their own or families that whitewashed themselves to hide who they are, much like my own family has. These pieces hit hard while reading them, leaving me wanting to tell my own story instead of biting it back in fear of ‘not fitting’ the expected mold.

To me, I found these pieces well done. However, about half way through this collection, the formatting sort of gave out on me. Sentences ran into other sentences, not ending but cut off suddenly. Some poems make use of different colored fonts while others have the same idea, but the formatting  made it repeat the sentence above when it wasn’t meant to. As it was, the white colored fonts can’t be seen well on kindles, leaving your eyes hurting trying to read it. A more common issue with ebooks on kindles is art work getting cut to pieces so it’s not a full images but small pieces. This was an issue through this arc as well. I felt like the formatting issues did effect my impression simply because half of the pieces I couldn’t understand because I had to try and repiece the pieces together again, leaving me a little frustrated. Hopefully, this can be fixed before this goes out into ebook formats.

Do I recommend this? Yes. Wait to get it in physical form or for the publishers say that formatting has been fixed for ebooks if you get it. I find it a really important read and one that touched my soul and my own experience of trying to find my way of my heritage and understand what that means for the woman I am, as a Metis, who’s family that has been rewritting who they are to hide this side. I feel like this book is important to both Indigenous women and women who want to better understand the struggle.

Rating: 4 stars

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A not so Dreadful Tale

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The Dreadful Tale of Prosper Redding

by Alexandra Bracken

Prosper is the only unexceptional Redding in his old and storied family history — that is, until he discovers the demon living inside him. Turns out Prosper’s great-great-great-great-great-something grandfather made — and then broke — a contract with a malefactor, a demon who exchanges fortune for eternal servitude. And, weirdly enough, four-thousand-year-old Alastor isn’t exactly the forgiving type. 

 

Remember how I said Middle Grade books win this year? Well, this book just proves this fact in Alexandra Bracken’s newest book that comes out this fall. It also happens to be my new favourite book by her, and I’ve read at least the first book of each of her series that are currently out. And here’s why: We follow the story of Prosper Redding, a bit of a sad kid who’s bullied at school and who has become distant to his once close twin sister. He doesn’t fit in with the rest of his family either. More so when he finds out his ancestor made a deal with a demon, who just happens to residing in Prosper currently. I don’t want to give much more away about it though. You’ll have to trust me that Prosper’s tale manages to become even more magical from there. Just take the warning in the first few pages of this book to heart, don’t trust a Redding. Or really anyone for that matter.

The writing in this book is just so much fun. To me, it was one of Bracken’s better crafted stories and it doesn’t get too boring, only a few moments that slowed down and left me crazy because I needed to know where the plot went past the filler section. As someone who loves witches and grew up on Harry Potter magic, this book had just the right amount of magic in it while bringing us a whole new ideas while feeling familiar. It also has the right amount of spookiness without being completely scary. I admit, I was creeped out a few times, so maybe not read this with younger readers just yet, but let them once they’re in middle school, in my personal opinion just to keep it on the safe side. As for the writing quality, it was good. Unlike in some of the past books I read from Bracken, there wasn’t as much unneeded moments in this book. There was a few that I wouldn’t mind not seeing, but most of them come with at least a small purpose behind it, which we do find out later. I think she finally found the right balance in my opinion.

Do I recommend this book? Yes. Highly. I’d seriously run to my store and preorder it now. If that isn’t an option yet, then wait for it to be, mark on all your calendars and whatever else until you can. It’s the perfect book for most ages and is perfect for fans of Hocus Pocus. It might be the only thing that ever comes as good and so purely Halloween as this movie.

Rating: 5 stars

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The Upside of Adorable

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The Upside of Unrequited

by Becky Albertalli

Seventeen-year-old Molly Peskin-Suso knows all about unrequited love—she’s lived through it twenty-six times. She crushes hard and crushes often, but always in secret. Because no matter how many times her twin sister, Cassie, tells her to woman up, Molly can’t stomach the idea of rejection. So she’s careful. Fat girls always have to be careful.

 

I admit, I got accepted for this eARC ages ago. But with other hot releases I was also approved for this, this book got put on the back burner. And part of why was because I was sort of scared to read it. I had heard both good and bad about Becky’s first book. The comment about gay girls having it easier was a turn off. But Becky, the champ she is, came out and apologized for that comment and explained it wasn’t how she personally felt. For me, I was willing to give Becky’s books a chance and I kept seeing this one getting praises. So I jumped in with Unrequited. And I’m SO happy I finally did. Because I’m not kidding when I say this book is one of the sweetest stories I’ve read this year. I’m not a big romance person, but this book hit all the right notes for me.

The story follows Molly Peskin-Suso through her experiences of trying to find love and her twin sister’s determination for Molly to finally get her first kiss. Molly is chubby and full of anxiety. Basically, I related to her instantly because I’m pretty sure more than once when I was her age I had the same thoughts. Heck, I probably still do. Molly fears she’s not what boys look for, that no one would find someone big attractive. She meets Reid and slowly develops a crush on him while her sister is trying to set her up with Will, a friend of her sister’s girlfriend. Oh, did I mention most of the characters in this book are gay? Because let me tell you, as someone desperate for more gay characters in books, I loved this, even if Molly herself may not be.

This book was just magic to me. It was sweet and soft and it was just what I needed to remind that some romances are amazing. I loved reading a character like Molly who reminds me of myself a lot. She’s a sweet character who just wants love, which was me when I was younger. She’s nervous of what people will think of her and her anxiety doesn’t help. The anxiety in this book was done so well. I always fear that it’ll be made romantic like mental illness sadly has been in a lot of YA book, but this wasn’t the case. Unless you yourself don’t have anxiety, you might not know that Molly’s thoughts are caused by it. But as someone who suffers from it pretty badly, I saw it clear as day. I’m so happy it wasn’t the main focus of the book, but was done realistically.

Another aspect I loved was the relationship between Molly and Cassie as twins. I love sisters. And to me, having grown up with a sister the same age as me, I can say that the sense of a distance growing happens. This book expressed this experience well and beautifully. Sadly, sisters grow apart. They fight. But it doesn’t change that they’re sisters. They want each other to be happy and I found how Cassie was determined to set Molly up with someone as something familiar.

The writing was really good and though the story itself was simple, I loved it. For once I didn’t mind a love triangle that was sort of there. It didn’t feel like others. It was teenagers trying to find themselves and that’s okay. Sometimes it’s too heavy handed, but this wasn’t like that. I loved the sweet moments with Molly and Reid and how soft they were. Sometimes I need relationships with soft characters that are sweet and nerdy and just lovely. I loved the wedding of Molly’s moms and just the diversity of this book. It was done well. It felt like you could easily meet this family out in the world. To me, this book was just everything I needed for this moment. It was hard to put down and made me happy, left me sad, left me aching for the characters.

I highly recommend it. It might not be for everyone. I know some people didn’t like it or understand it. But it’s okay to admit this book wasn’t targeted for you as an audience. But if you want a story with really great characters that are gay, that come from a mixed raced family, a character with anxiety and characters that want love.

Rating: 4 stars