Read Women

(Review) Where The Watermelons Grow

Where the Watermelons Grow

by Cindy Baldwin

Twelve-year-old Della Kelly has lived her whole life in Maryville, North Carolina. She knows how to pick the softest butter beans and sweetest watermelons on her daddy’s farm. She knows ways to keep her spitfire baby sister out of trouble (most of the time). She knows everyone in Maryville, from her best friend Arden to kind newcomer Miss Lorena to the mysterious Bee Lady.
And Della knows what to do when the sickness that landed her mama in the hospital four years ago spirals out of control again, and Mama starts hearing people who aren’t there, scrubbing the kitchen floor until her hands are raw, and waking up at night to cut the black seeds from all the watermelons in the house. With Daddy struggling to save the farm from a record-breaking drought, Della decides it’s up to her to heal Mama for good. And she knows just how she’ll do it: with a jar of the Bee Lady’s magic honey, which has mended the wounds and woes of Maryville for generations.
She doesn’t want to hear the Bee Lady’s truth: that the solution might have less to do with fixing Mama’s brain than with healing Della’s own heart. But as the sweltering summer stretches on, Della must learn—with the help of her family and friends, plus a fingerful of watermelon honey—that love means accepting her mama just as she is.

I’ve read a lot of good books lately and a lot of bad, leaving me in such a reading slump that I picked up about ten books, putting each back down before even getting to 50%. When a friend of mine heard this, they suggested “Where the Watermelons Grow”, which I was lucky enough to have received an ARC for earlier this year. And I’m so thankful I had. This book is an amazing read that faces the reality of living with someone with a mental illness and more, so the ones not talked about in popular media.

 

This book follows Della, the oldest of two girls in a family living on a farm, struggling to make ends meet due to a drought and a host of other issues. One night, Della walks into the kitchen to find her mother carving up a watermelon, saying she didn’t want her or her little sister to swallow the seeds and that it would make them sick. This is the hint of what is coming. You see, her mother had schizophrenia, an illness she had suffered from since Della was born and who often blames herself for having ‘triggered’ the illness. We follow Della as she learns to accept her mother’s illness and that there was no magical fix for it.

 

This book is basically the book all of us who suffer from the less popular mental illnesses such as anxiety and clinical depression. It talks about mental illness in a smart and honest way. Della becomes obsessed with the idea that the magic bee honey in town can fix her mother, when she finds out that it can’t, she then searches for ways she can fix it, having blamed herself for the illness in the first place. This book is honest and heartfelt. I struggled to put this book down for days, even reading it in the last few minutes before I went into surgery yesterday.

 

The writing in this book is lovely. The characters even more lovely. As Della learns that not all families are perfect as those seen on TV, that there’s such thing as a found family, and that nothing is ever what it seems, we go through the ride and steps with her. Della is at the age where she wants to believe in magic honey and that the world can be easily fixed. When none of it goes as planned, she tries harder and harder to make these things happen.

 

My all-time favorite thing about this book is the how it talked about mental illness. While people like to pretend that things like honey and nature can cure mental illness (from those who don’t have it), this book puts an end to this idea right away. There is no magic. Just medicine and professional help. It’s a hard we all face either due to a loved one with it or ourselves. There is no magic cure, no matter how hard we might wish.

 

The portrayal of mental illness struck home. I found it done well and in an order that actually makes sense. There are triggers, there are moments of believed clarity, of moments of sharp downturns and a need for control. This book doesn’t pretend otherwise. And the writing makes it clear, there is no magic cure, period. The honey only works as ‘magic’ because it helped people find strength and hope within it. As nice as a magic story is, there’s more to it. Always.

 

I highly, highly recommend this book. It’s a quick read that will keep you reading no matter what.

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Own Voice Authors, Read Women, Reviews

Review: Trail of Lightning

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Trail of Lightning

by Rebecca Roanhorse

While most of the world has drowned beneath the sudden rising waters of a climate apocalypse, Dinétah (formerly the Navajo reservation) has been reborn. The gods and heroes of legend walk the land, but so do monsters.

Maggie Hoskie is a Dinétah monster hunter, a supernaturally gifted killer. When a small town needs help finding a missing girl, Maggie is their last—and best—hope. But what Maggie uncovers about the monster is much larger and more terrifying than anything she could imagine.

Maggie reluctantly enlists the aid of Kai Arviso, an unconventional medicine man, and together they travel to the rez to unravel clues from ancient legends, trade favors with tricksters, and battle dark witchcraft in a patchwork world of deteriorating technology.

As Maggie discovers the truth behind the disappearances, she will have to confront her past—if she wants to survive.

Welcome to the Sixth World.

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (and 5x 💜)

 

Part fantasy, part dystopian novel, this book brings these genres into a new light and giving us something we haven’t read it based on Native American history and beliefs. The world has been just about destroyed by global warming and Native Tribes have once again taken back whats left of the United States, now known as Dinétah. The novel is heavy with Native American terms, history, beliefs, and more. Which is what brings a new level to this genre and makes an exciting read that’s near impossible to put down. Maggie, the main character, is strong, fierce, and admits she’s no hero. She drives the story and keeps things from ever getting slow. She drives the pace for the fact she can’t seem to slow down. She faces off with monsters and gods, making friends and enemies (a lot of enemies) on the way.

I loved every second of this. I had seen the hype for it on twitter and was extremely interested so I added it to my edelweiss, where the publisher then contacted me to tell me I could get it on Netgalley, after a struggle of trying to get it for a week on Edelweiss. I basically stopped reading everything for this book. And I have zero regrets about it. It probably renewed a love for more Urban-esq Fantasies and even Dystopian worlds. It’s so unlike any book I’ve read and in part, it’s because of how the author drew from her culture. I have a basic knowledge of some Native American tribes and history in part because I’ve taken classes at my college, but I admit, I didn’t know a lot fo the things mentioned in the story or locations until after (it just happens this week we’re learning about one of the big locations in the book). It’s why I’m saying this now: don’t let that scare you away from the story if you don’t know. Take time to read this and use google if you need to. Learn about another culture through this amazing book. The book isn’t written for most of us, but it doesn’t mean you can’t sit down and try it and enjoy it like I did. Which I’m happy I did, it’s joined the group of one of my all time favourite reads.

Maggie as a character is similar to a lot of dystopian female characters, the difference, she’s hard and fierce because she was raised that way by gods. She learned to hunter monsters because of who took her in and due to her clan powers. She actually has a blood lust built into her. But she’s leveled out by Kai, a man she meets who’s a medicine man who doesn’t believe in violence and tries to tell Maggie that there are other ways of going about different then she always has. Kai is a balancing force while also one new to the area, having lived outside of Dinétah, though still knows a lot more then a lot of readers might being Native himself. There are characters who aren’t Native, we meet a mixed race family later in the book who is African American and white. And of course, there are plenty of gods running around this story.

Why this book matters: it was written by a Native American author who draws on their own culture in a way a lot of people outside of it might not know. They avoided the normal Native stereotypes that white people have branded them with while a the same time using those familiar ideas and twisting them to the correct way. There are Medicine Men, Monster Hunters, Warriors, Outlaws, and simple people just trying to survive.

Do I recommend? Uh, yeah. If you haven’t really been paying attention, I’m basically yelling that you should preorder this now and learn about a culture that deserves to be heard. This story and series is my new everything.

 

Reviews

Solo

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Solo

by Kwame AlexanderMary Rand Hess

Solo, a YA novel in poetic verse, tells the story of seventeen-year-old Blade Morrison, whose life is bombarded with scathing tabloids and a father struggling with just about every addiction under the sun—including a desperate desire to make a comeback. Haunted by memories of his mother and his family’s ruin, Blade’s only hope is in the forbidden love of his girlfriend. But when he discovers a deeply protected family secret, Blade sets out on a journey across the globe that will change everything he thought to be true.

This lovely, emotional story follows Blade Morrison, son of a famous rocker, as he leaves high school and is preparing for college. But everything he knows gets turned on it’s head all at once. He finds out he’s adopted after a fight with his sister over their father’s embarrassing antics, he finds out the girl he loves has been cheating on him after he gets her named inked in his skin. He goes on a journey to understand all of this by chasing after his birth mother who is in Ghana. In this journey he learns to forgive his father, learns that he can still love, and that the music he thought dead in him still is very much still alive.

This book is surprisingly unique with it’s story. It tells the story in prose and lyrics, leaving the experience even more beautiful and even more gripping. Blade is unhappy in his life of having lost his mother, having grown up with drug addict of a father, and he wishes simply to be normal. You can feel the pain of the character yourself, of someone who is on the cusp of change, one he thinks he understands only to learn he was completely wrong. It was simply a joy to read and get a better idea of the emotions Blade experiences. The lyrical feel is perfect with how this story is tied in to music so intensely. I don’t think the story would have been such an impactful read without it.

The plot was interesting and a new take in finding one’s self, in my opinion. It’s full of so many twists and turns that you don’t see half of them coming. You go into the story thinking you know what this story is about only for everything to get flipped on it’s head. And it did this well, never just letting one of those plots come up without just forgetting about them. It does leave some questions unanswered, but to me, it felt like it was part of life. Sometimes, you don’t get the answers you want, but it doesn’t mean its not important. Sometimes no answer is answer enough to get an idea of the possibilities. We see the pieces of Blade’s life that leads to this change, we don’t see the aftermath, but that’s okay. This story is about him finding who he really is, even if he doesn’t fully understand who that is fully. We don’t know what happens after Ghana. We leave the story in a heart breaking moment, but one that you know will change more than one character in this story due to the cruel reality of this world.

Do I recommend this? Yes. I think it’s such a brilliant read with such an unique way of telling it. It’s a quick read, one I did a lot quicker than I thought I would. In part, it’s because it’s such an addicting style and the emotions in it make you desperately want to know what happens next. I do warn ahead of time of some triggers: drug use, abusive relationships, implied rape, and death.

Rating: 4 stars 

 

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The Tiger’s Watch

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The Tiger’s Watch 

by Julia Ember

Sixteen-year-old Tashi has spent their life training as a inhabitor, a soldier who spies and kills using a bonded animal. When the capital falls after a brutal siege, Tashi flees to a remote monastery to hide. But the invading army turns the monastery into a hospital, and Tashi catches the eye of Xian, the regiment’s fearless young commander.
Tashi spies on Xian’s every move. In front of his men, Xian seems dangerous, even sadistic, but Tashi discovers a more vulnerable side of the enemy commander—a side that draws them to Xian.
When their spying unveils that everything they’ve been taught is a lie, Tashi faces an impossible choice: save their country or the boy they’re growing to love. Though Tashi grapples with their decision, their volatile bonded tiger doesn’t question her allegiances. Katala slaughters Xian’s soldiers, leading the enemy to hunt her. But an inhabitor’s bond to their animal is for life—if Katala dies, so will Tashi.

We follow Tashi, a young inhabitor as they flee from a sudden outbreak of war, leaving their country in ruins. But Tashi and their friend Pharo must hide so that they aren’t caught and found out what they are by the invading army, inhabitor’s possessing a magic that the other country desperately wants. So they hide in among monks as one of the commanders takes a post at that monastery, taking Tashi as a servant. Tashi risks themselves as a very reluctant spy in hopes of finding information that might find out information they can use against them.

Not my best little summary, I admit, but this book is all levels of complicated that I didn’t really stand a chance to describe it without giving away too much or leaving out important elements. I will say of the books I’ve read by Julia Ember, this has to be my favourite one so far. This book has roots in Asian culture and reminds me strangely of Avatar the Last Airbender. Though there’s no bending of elements, the magic in this book and the idea of those who posses it giving up their lives to keep a balance in the world reminds me hands down of Avatar. Fans of the show would probably enjoy this book.

Tashi as a main character is really interesting. Their genderfluid (which made this my first full novel I’ve read with someone genderfluid and I seriously freaked out). They are brave in their own way, but sensitive, which makes some characters look down on them. That doesn’t change the fact their strong. They just aren’t the normal pig headed, rush into danger type of protagonist. They’re one of the few that put themselves and the ones they love first, not just the greater good. They’re forced to make a hard choice, but one that will help some but possibly hurt more. And it’s something they grapple with in a thoughtful manner. If I was in their position, I honestly don’t know what I would have done. It’s also diverse and gives us an interesting cast of characters next to Tashi. Every character is complicated and has a story that is just as gripping and leaves you desperately wanting to know more.

The plot of this book is beautiful. There wasn’t a slow moment in the whole book. You know someone is wrapped up in a story that the sun sets and they don’t notice their reading in the dark until someone points it out to them. Which happened to me with the last half of the book. I was just completely wrapped up in this story. I honestly can’t wait for the second book and need to know what happens. I’ve read good books this year, but not one that wraps me up so completely as this book had without me feeling bored at least in one or two parts of it.

The writing itself was well done. I saw everything clearly in my mind and it was simply beautifully done. The only thing I had a small problem with was the fact a queer character died to advance the plot and the character of Tashi. I don’t know if it can be considered a ‘bury your gays’ situation because its complicated from the start because as soon as we start the book we know this character will die. All of the inhabitors know they will die young. It’s part of the balance I mentioned before.

The world building in this book is well done. The conflict itself is part of what reminds me of Avatar along with the use of magic. I honestly love how much thought went into each place and each of their cultures. It’s been a while since I read a fantasy novel that gives us a world so completely thought out like this. And that just adds to awesome quality of this book.

Do I recommend this? H*ck yes. Go get this book as soon as you can. If you love magic and the feeling that Avatar gave you, pick this up, enjoy it, and come gush with me because I need to gush about this book with you.

Rating: 5 stars

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August Reading Challenges

So there are a BUNCH of awesome reading challenges this coming month. I’m going to be taking part in TWO. One is the #TheReadingQuest hosted by the blog ReadAtMidnight. Basically, this is one of the coolest reading challenges I’ve seen in ages.

Reading Quest Board

Like many RPG games out, you pick a class for a character and you follow their laid out path and those are the books you read first. I normally go Rogue, but for this one I’ve decided to start with Mage. Once you finish one class, you can start another one. You get so many points per square depending on what kind of book you read and so on. Basically, jump on this one. It’s so awesome and I can’t wait to start.

The Reading Quest Character Card Creator1

The second one is the ARC August reading challenge done by ReadSleepRepeat is to get through my rather huge list of ARCs that I’ve been trying to read for ages that’s continually getting bigger. With school starting this coming up this month (I have no idea when they don’t make the start date readily available. Ever), reviews might become a little less often. My hope is by dong this I’ll have a bunch read before hand and scheduled for you guys.

So this is what I’m doing this month.

#TheReadingQuest Books:

A Book With A One Word Title:

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body

Rating: 4 stars

A Book That Contains Magic:

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Rating: 4 stars

A Book Based on Mythology: 

Serpentine (Serpentine, #1)

Rating: 3 stars

A First Book In A Series:

The Girl with the Red Balloon (The Balloonmakers, #1)

Rating: 5 stars

 

#ARCAugust Books:

The Tea Dragon Society

Rating: 5 stars

Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body

Rating: 4 stars

33589940

Rating: 4 stars

Wicked Like a Wildfire (Hibiscus Daughter, #1)

Rating: 3 stars

My Rad Life: A Journal

Rating: 4 stars

The Girl with the Red Balloon (The Balloonmakers, #1)

Rating: 5 stars

What reading plans do you have for August? 

 

Reviews, Uncategorized

The Traitor’s Tunnel

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The Traitor’s Tunnel (A Trident Chronicles Novella)

by C.M. Spivey

Witch-blooded robber Bridget has made a reputation for herself in the capital city, but she’s not interested in the attention of the Thieves’ Guild–and she’s not bothered by the rumors of urchin kidnappings, either. With winter coming, she’s looking out for herself and no one else.
Until she picks the wrong pocket, and recognizes her estranged brother Teddy.
Young craftsman Theodor arrives in the capital ready to take the final step toward his dream career as Lord Engineer of Arido. His apprenticeship with a renowned city engineer comes with new rules and challenges, but it’s worth it for the exposure to the Imperial Council.

I was lucky enough to get this novella from the author a few months ago. But as you guys know, I sort of hit a wall when it came fantasy for a while, putting this book on the back burner, despite the fact I’d been dying to read it. Thanks to help of The Adventure Zone podcast, I found my fantasy love again and was finally able to pick this book up.

We follow both Bridget and Theodor through this novella, estranged siblings who meet once more when Teddy takes up his apprenticeship. The two of them plus both of their partners become entangled with a plot happening in the city that involves human trafficking, people like Bridget with no real home and who live on the streets.

I did enjoy this read. Unlike most fantasy books that insist on being old fashion and against things like LGBTQA+ rights, this book turns that idea on its head. The book is filled with diversity and tells a story accepting of everyone, which has been one of my issues with fantasy of late. Bridget has dated men and women, Theodor is asexual with a male partner, who choose to be male. Without knowing genders, the characters go to gender neutral pronouns, never assuming. All of which is a breath of fresh air.

As for the world itself, part of me wishes I had read ‘Under The Mountain’ first to better understand this world, but you don’t need to to read this novella. It’s able to stand on it’s own well and did cover the basics of this well thought out and well written world that makes you want more of it. That on it’s own makes me want to read the original series to learn more and grasp more. I loved the mixed of fantasy and witchcraft, all an original idea that isn’t like the typical witch books you see out.

I enjoyed this story. With it being a novella, I felt the plot was a bit rushed at the end, the whole time looking at how much I had left and wondering how it would pull it all off. I felt like it could have been a little smother, that it could have been a little longer to make it that way, but at the same time, I can see and understand why it wasn’t. I personally would love to see more of these characters and what happens next with their lives, but also knowing that the excitement they experiences probably wouldn’t happen again. The only thing I would change was maybe introduce the plot a little sooner in the story so it’s less rushed, but honestly, it didn’t bother me all that much because it felt like it was happening right.

I highly recommend this read if you want a quick read that involves a well rounded cast of characters that is diverse and a story that keeps you guessing.

Rating: 4 stars

Read Women, Reviews

A not so Dreadful Tale

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The Dreadful Tale of Prosper Redding

by Alexandra Bracken

Prosper is the only unexceptional Redding in his old and storied family history — that is, until he discovers the demon living inside him. Turns out Prosper’s great-great-great-great-great-something grandfather made — and then broke — a contract with a malefactor, a demon who exchanges fortune for eternal servitude. And, weirdly enough, four-thousand-year-old Alastor isn’t exactly the forgiving type. 

 

Remember how I said Middle Grade books win this year? Well, this book just proves this fact in Alexandra Bracken’s newest book that comes out this fall. It also happens to be my new favourite book by her, and I’ve read at least the first book of each of her series that are currently out. And here’s why: We follow the story of Prosper Redding, a bit of a sad kid who’s bullied at school and who has become distant to his once close twin sister. He doesn’t fit in with the rest of his family either. More so when he finds out his ancestor made a deal with a demon, who just happens to residing in Prosper currently. I don’t want to give much more away about it though. You’ll have to trust me that Prosper’s tale manages to become even more magical from there. Just take the warning in the first few pages of this book to heart, don’t trust a Redding. Or really anyone for that matter.

The writing in this book is just so much fun. To me, it was one of Bracken’s better crafted stories and it doesn’t get too boring, only a few moments that slowed down and left me crazy because I needed to know where the plot went past the filler section. As someone who loves witches and grew up on Harry Potter magic, this book had just the right amount of magic in it while bringing us a whole new ideas while feeling familiar. It also has the right amount of spookiness without being completely scary. I admit, I was creeped out a few times, so maybe not read this with younger readers just yet, but let them once they’re in middle school, in my personal opinion just to keep it on the safe side. As for the writing quality, it was good. Unlike in some of the past books I read from Bracken, there wasn’t as much unneeded moments in this book. There was a few that I wouldn’t mind not seeing, but most of them come with at least a small purpose behind it, which we do find out later. I think she finally found the right balance in my opinion.

Do I recommend this book? Yes. Highly. I’d seriously run to my store and preorder it now. If that isn’t an option yet, then wait for it to be, mark on all your calendars and whatever else until you can. It’s the perfect book for most ages and is perfect for fans of Hocus Pocus. It might be the only thing that ever comes as good and so purely Halloween as this movie.

Rating: 5 stars

Reviews

Magical Alphabet

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An Alphabet of Embers (The Machineries of Empire “Calendrical Rot”)

edited by Rose Lemberg

An Alphabet of Embers is an anthology of unclassifiables – lyrical, surreal, magical, experimental pieces that straddle the border between poetry and prose. It lives in a place between darkness and sound, between roads and breaths, its pages taut with starlight; between its covers, words talk to each other, and have an occasional cup of tea.

 

This collection of stories were as the description calls it – magical. It was unique and left you feeling like you’ve never heard stories like it before. The stories come from a diverse cast of writers from around the world, giving you a diverse collection of stories and characters. One of my favourite stories had to do with an idea of genderfluidness, which I happen to be. This was the first story I ever read with a genderfluid set of characters and I honestly can’t get enough of it. I’ll probably end up holding that story close to me for that reason, and the fact it was so well written that it made me so happy for this progress.

As I’ve mentioned before, it’s hard to really critique short stories, more so ones that are relatively short, only a page or two, which a few were. For the most part, these stories were done in a way that was prose or lyrical. Which is something I always love. However, there were a few that felt like simply words thrown together to creative something, but I couldn’t seem to see the story in it. It’s possible that when I read it, my brain was too tired to comprehend what they were about or it just went over my head, but I struggled to find stories in them, which was really disappointing in comparison to the overall beautifully done stories that were stories that were actually stories. There were also a few stories that weren’t long enough in my opinion to actually make it a full story. I felt like the plot was just shortly brushed over and it didn’t have the same impact as some of the others.

However, I HIGHLY recommend this book for people who want sci-fi/fantasy stories created by a diverse cast of writers that touch on their own cultures.

Rating: 4 stars 

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Books with ALL THE BEST COVERS (part 6)

It’s been a while since I last did one of these series, but I hadn’t seen too many books lately that fit exactly what I was looking for in this. But FINALLY I have one.

As you know, I’ve read and reviewed Tash Hearts Tolstoy before it came out a bit a go and was a fan. Well, this book is back for this series. Now I loved the original cover. I’m a sucker for old images with writing on it like this.

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(English Cover)

(Brazilian Cover)

 

(Polish Cover)

Okay, so it’s only two other covers so far. But MAN. I love them. Which has me excited to see what others end up happening. They’re creative and fun and I think all of them fit the story and characters so. Another book to add to my list of books I want to buy all the covers for.

AsianLitBingo, Pride Month, Read Women

Noteworthy

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Noteworthy

by Riley Redgate

Jordan Sun is embarking on her junior year at the Kensington-Blaine Boarding School for the Performing Arts, hopeful that this will be her time: the year she finally gets cast in the school musical. But when her low Alto 2 voice gets her shut out for the third straight year—threatening her future at Kensington-Blaine and jeopardizing her college applications—she’s forced to consider nontraditional options.
In Jordan’s case, really nontraditional. A spot has opened up in the Sharpshooters, Kensington’s elite a cappella octet. Worshipped…revered…all male. Desperate to prove herself, Jordan auditions in her most convincing drag, and it turns out that Jordan Sun, Tenor 1, is exactly what the Sharps are looking for.

This book was the perfect read to go from Asian Heritage month to Pride month. The main character is first generation American and find out within this journey of this book that she’s bisexual.

I was in chorus for a good chunk of my early life. Like Jordan, I had a deep voice for a woman. I often sang tenor or alto 2. Like Jordan, it wasn’t a fan of my high school music teacher that kept trying to make me sing higher until my rang was somewhere in the middle but not as great. As you can imagine, that didn’t sit overly well with me when I had worked hard for my range. My love music sort of dried up by that time. So almost right away I related with Jordan’s situation. I admit this book did catch my interest a little, but due to my lack of interest in music drying up, it was only when I heard great reviews from others that I finally put in for this ARC and was approved rather quickly, to my joy.

I found the book really interesting. I think it did a good job with keeping the audience on their toes so that the first half of the book didn’t get boring despite the lack of action to the main plot. However, I did find most of the last part of the book predictable. I knew what relationship Jordan would end up with, how her identity would end up being revealed the way it was. If anything, I don’t believe in a real situation it would have taken so long. I’m really surprised that the teachers didn’t look into the kids trying out for the Sharps before they were let into the group to make sure they’re students at the school. For me, it was the smaller things within the story that was more unpredictable than the main plot lines. I found the rivalry between them and the Minuets was very unpredictable and could have been ugly if Jordan hinted about what she knew about their leader. I would have loved if she used the fact she was a girl that was beat up to throw said leader, but that was just my own opinion. It could have gotten ugly with her threatening to reveal that she knew that the leader was gay, but I think that the book did good by not doing this, which is harmful for any gay person, much more than being beat up. I know a lot of authors would have, I’m just happy that this author learned from her first book how to better write gay characters in a less harmful way. I would have loved for some sort of plot twist though that wasn’t so obvious to see coming.

The writing itself was pretty amazing. I found it really well done and almost lyrical in it’s own right. I didn’t find much to really critique because I was too busy highlighting some of the more beautiful phrases, the end of the book even more so than the rest. I loved the diverse cast of characters, how music could be found in the writing, and the friendship between the characters. The friendship in this book was probably my favourite part. I think it would have been even better without a relationship happening and just kept a good friendship mostly because it would have made this book stand out more than others. I’m still craving a book that chooses friendships over relationships, but alas this only gave me a little of it but added a relationship that I’m only so-so about. I’m also a bit so-so with her figuring out her sexuality but it not really mean anything. She could have not and nothing would have really changed the story. If anything, she could have bonded with the other gay character, but she doesn’t do that. It’s not a coming out story, or really anything with her being bi other than a small mention of it. I think it could have been used to help patch her relationship with her friend because she never lied about not being gay when she’s bi. Instead, she sort of just buries it too. To me, it just doesn’t make sense other than trying to put diversity into a story but not think anymore about it. It might be the only thing in the writing I don’t like, just because it feels sort of half done.

Do I recommend it? I do. I think that if you like music or don’t, there’s things about it that are good and great, some things that are a bit off, but it could have easily been fixed for the final version. This is just a reminder that this is an ARC. If they did fix it and you’ve read it, let me know and I’ll add a note about that. But all in all, I did enjoy this read. It was a really fun contemporary read.

Rating: 4 stars